Burt Herman, à propos de Storify (et des journalistes entrepreneurs) cc @xdamman

Storify

The idea comes from thinking about the future of journalism and the fact that everyone now is creating so much content. We’re flooded with Tweets, YouTube videos, Flickr photos and everything else. Everyone can be a « reporter » when an event happens. But not everyone is a « journalist » — making sense of an issue and giving the context. So we built a system to help people do this, take the best of social media and make it into a story — to « storify » it. The word itself is actually in the dictionary, and also comes from my AP days when editors would send messages to bureaus asking them to « storify » something.

L’intégralité de cette interview est disponible sur Online Journalism Review.

Mon Storify perso est ici

Les bons liens de la veille ( 17 décembre au 27 décembre )

Voici quelques articles dont la pertinence/l’intérêt m’ont marqué au cours des derniers jours. Faites-en bon usage ! 🙂 lire la suite « Les bons liens de la veille ( 17 décembre au 27 décembre ) »

Les bons liens de la veille ( 16 novembre au 23 novembre )

Voici quelques articles dont la pertinence/l’intérêt m’ont marqué au cours des derniers jours. Faites-en bon usage ! 🙂 lire la suite « Les bons liens de la veille ( 16 novembre au 23 novembre ) »

Les bons liens de la veille ( 10 novembre au 16 novembre )

Voici quelques articles dont la pertinence/l’intérêt m’ont marqué au cours des derniers jours. Faites-en bon usage ! 🙂

  • Calls on the President to actually USE Twitter (@marshallk ) – Maybe you should try it sometime, Mr. Obama. And while you’re at it, you should ask someone to brief you on the movement for distributed social networking standards. A speaking gig in China would have been a great opportunity to sing the praises of decentralized, standards-based, interoperable, free-market competition in communication technologies. That’s the next part of the Twitter story
  • How Social Media is Taking the News Local – Early last year, journalists Cory Bergman and his wife, Kate, started a Seattle-area neighborhood network of news blogs called Next Door Media, which won the Online News Association’s first Community Collaboration award in 2009.Cory Bergman said in an e-mail interview that about 80% of their stories come from their neighbors and what they post in the blogs’ forums, comments, e-mail, Facebook and Twitter. Experienced journalists who live in the neighborhood cover stories they find via those methods, using traditional journalism skills to gather and confirm information. When the stories are posted to the blogs, a hat tip is given to the user who originated the idea.
  • Excellente synthèse du débat Murdoch-Google et de la couverture Twitter de la tuerie de Ft. Hood – In this week’s edition, I look at recent comments by News Corp. honcho Rupert Murdoch about taking his content out of Google searches, and how many people reacted to it. Plus, many news organizations made Twitter Lists to cover the Ft. Hood shooting, but the Austin American-Statesman had an excellent Twitter feed of original and aggregated information. And Salon CEO Richard Gingras talks about how his site will be funding investigative journalism with soft-news features.
  • A Microformat with Major Implications for The Newsroom – Imagine this: you visit one of your favorite news sites and the homepage displays a notification that an article you read yesterday has been updated with new information, and a story you read last week has been corrected. The notification enables you to click on a link and read the correction, or to be taken to the updated story.
  • 500 Internal Server Error – 500 Internal Server Error
  • Why Google Latitude’s added features have potential for mobile journalism ( /by @paulbradshaw ) – Google Latitude, a service that works with your mobile phone to enable people to see where you are, has launched 2 new services with interesting potential for mobile journalism: Location History and Location Alerts.
  • 500 Internal Server Error – 500 Internal Server Error
  • My students don’t have TVs … – CBC News wants to attract younger viewers with its recent relaunch, but as Carleton broadcast journalist instructor Marilyn Mercer found out, many of her students don’t have TVs or cable subscription
  • « Welt Kompakt » among the first newspapers around the world to integrate Google Wave into its coverage (via @philaloux ) – Welt Kompakt, a spinoff of the German daily Die Welt, is among the first newspapers around the world to integrate Google Wave into its coverage, Revolution Magazine reported yesterday. The addition comes even as the lifestyle daily also invites readers to follow its editors – and contribute to content – via the free tabloid’s Twitter account, Welt Kompakt yesterday announced.
  • Le New York Times publie un article financé par souscription du public (Spot.us). (via @eni_kao et @couve ) – The New York Times has published a story about the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” by Lindsey Hoshaw that was funded in part through the “community funded journalism” site Spot.Us, which helped Hoshaw raise $10,000 from more than 100 people so she could report the story.

Les bons liens de la veille ( 3 novembre au 7 novembre )

Voici quelques articles dont la pertinence/l’intérêt m’ont marqué au cours des derniers jours. Faites-en bon usage ! 🙂 lire la suite « Les bons liens de la veille ( 3 novembre au 7 novembre ) »